Growing Newbury Green

Growing Newbury Green

Growing Newbury Green was formed in 2012 after founder member Jeremy Gorbold suggested growing fruit trees on open spaces and parks in Newbury. With the agreement of Newbury Town Council we planted our first orchard at Barn Crescent that year and kept going from there! We now have over 60 apple trees in several sites around the town and awaiting our first major harvest any year now.

Alongside that we branched (sorry) out to filling shopping trolleys with herbs and lettuces and displaying them around town to publicise the Newbury In Bloom competition and in 2018 had a larger raised bed sited on Lock Island by the canal to try out a more substantial planting of crops.

Alongside that we branched (sorry) out to filling shopping trolleys with herbs and lettuces and displaying them around town to publicise the Newbury In Bloom competition and in 2018 had a larger raised bed sited on Lock Island by the canal to try out a more substantial planting of crops. We want to make more free food available in the town – it’ll be local, fresh and an asset to the community over the coming years. Please join us on this growing journey.

We have an edible food bed on Lock Island – just by the Newbury canal lock in the centre of town.

First planted in 2019, it was left fallow last year due to the various lockdowns, but here we are in June finally getting it planted up again.

Many courgette plants were donated, so here’s hoping for a decent crop.

Newbury Friends of the Earth has teamed up with West Berkshire Council, Newbury Town Council and Hungerford Town Council to create three woods in the district as living memorials to the traumas of the coronavirus pandemic.

Newbury Town Council approached us in the summer about planting a new, small orchard on the green space by the bus stop in Glendale Avenue in Wash Common.

We have decided not to proceed with this one due to two reasons: firstly although the response from residents was very positive to the proposal we could not find enough volunteers to look after the trees for the first few crucial years; Secondly a second site visit revealed that the existing trees were larger than originally thought when we visited in the winter and that there was a risk that the new trees would be overhung by branches as well as limiting space for root development.

We are looking for other potential sites in the Wash Common area that may be more favourable.

Newbury Apple Day